What is the Answer?


When I first thought about writing this post I had a lot of things I wanted to say and there was going to be very little filtering involved, but I’ve had a little time to calm down and to measure my words carefully. I may say some things you disagree with and if you stop reading that is fine. You have a right not to read what I have to say. I hope that you will consider what I say as my honest feelings and respect them for what they are. With that being said, I am going to mention some things I have seen posted by friends on facebook and elsewhere. I am not going to call those friends out and I respect their right to say what they believe, but I wanted to be upfront with what may seem hypocritical on the surface.

Now, if you are ready to continue, read on and leave whatever comments you would like. I only ask that you keep things respectful. Continue reading “What is the Answer?”

100-Word Challenge, Day 142


The Creation of Adam
(Photo credit: Jessica_Branstetter)

Isolating darkness had opened her mind to the madness that lurks hidden in the black places of the universe. Ancient beings of unimaginable power, hidden behind the thin protective layer of reality, had spoken to her in whispers that never reached her ears. They assured her that there was no God; that such a benevolent entity would have been consumed by his jealous peers long before the creation of man. No, in their experience the universe was a cruel place made to be ruled by those who had the will to get what they wanted. Anyone who thought differently was a fool born to be ruled by others.

 

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100-Word Challenge, Day 141


The noise grew louder and its source more discernible, so Margaret clawed her way across the floor, slowly dragging her body across the floor. She was too weak to stand and her bloodied fingertips and broken nails provided little purchase on the cold, reinforced steel floor. She had already resigned herself to death, and made peace with her own mortality. Her time within the room had stripped her of any notion of a benevolent God, and even as she prayed for someone to open the door and rescue her, it was not the God of her youth that her silent pleas beseeched for deliverance.

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Apocalypse Rising Chapter 13 PREVIEW


Well the day is nearly upon us.  Apocalypse Rising’s official release is only a week away and I know I have been very quiet the last few weeks, so I thought I would share a finished chapter from the book and a video my friend Jan Marie made for me.

 

 

CHAPTER THIRTEEN

 

“What do you mean, he’s gone?” Neville asked. Continue reading “Apocalypse Rising Chapter 13 PREVIEW”

Book Review: Charlinder's Walk


“We’re not ‘afraid of’ anything except giving you lot the idea that there is anything to talk about involving your God. Just who are you to decide what anyone should be talking about around here, anyway?” demanded Miriam.

“Maybe we do it out of concern for your souls,” Ruth offered, still just as composed as ever above her array of slender knitting needles and two-ply yarn. “Maybe we want you to start talking about what led to the Plague because we don’t want you to suffer eternal damnation in Hell for your actions.”

Charlinder wanted to run home and bury himself under a pile of Eileen Woodlawn’s writings, but one look at Phoebe’s face showed him what he felt: they just couldn’t look away.

Miriam began laughing again. “And who’s going to tell us what kind of behavior is going to send us to Hell? You?” she scoffed. “That is, assuming your promises of Heaven and Hell are places that really exist, which I’m far from convinced they are, but you know how I really feel about what caused the Plague, and what your God may have had to do with it?”

“No, Miriam, tell me how you really feel,” Ruth said flatly.

“I just don’t care one way or the other. I don’t see why anyone gives a lamb’s tail about what caused a disease that snuffed itself out almost a hundred-twenty years ago, when we have much more important things to do than argue over what might have happened. The Plague is in the past; it is history. We need to take care of the present, and if you have enough time on your hands to be quibbling about something that far in the past, then you’re not doing enough to get this farm moving into the future.”

Phoebe looked extremely impressed with Miriam’s rant, but Ruth was unfazed.

“But what kind of future will we have if we just make the same mistakes that brought God’s anger on our ancestors? How many of us will survive another Plague?”

“And again I ask,” Miriam continued, “Who are you to know what any supposed God wants us to do, any more than the rest of us? And have you ever found it a little strange how your whole argument for why we should love God, and worship Him, and build our lives around bending to His will and honoring His divine plan, is that He supposedly brought about a disease that killed over six and a half billion people in less than two years? Have you ever considered how that looks to those of us who aren’t impressed with your reasoning for why God even exists in the first place? Any God who would do that to His creations for disobeying a moral code that He never even bothered to communicate to them is, as far as I care, not a God who deserves even our respect, much less our worship.”

This time, even Ruth was shocked. She finally blinked and recovered her voice enough to say, “There doesn’t have to be any mystery in what God expects from us. It’s a pity that none of our original survivors left a Bible in good enough condition to last this long, but all you have to do is pray, and listen to what He says.”

“Except I don’t think you, or any of the other Faithful, want us to pray,” Miriam told her. “You don’t want us to listen to voices only we can hear, and you don’t want us to discuss what we think may have happened over a hundred years ago. You want us to listen to you. And that’s why the rest of us don’t want to have this conversation. It doesn’t matter why our ancestors saw all their family and friends die of the Plague, because at this point, there’s nothing we can do to change the fact that it happened. Arguing about what they did to bring that disease on themselves isn’t going to make our children’s lives any easier or better. The only people who have any reason to care about why the Plague happened are long since dead.”

It is all too easy to ignore the arguments of someone you disagree with. Their argument falls on deaf ears as your counter-argument will be equally unheard. It is a rare thing to take the steps neccesary to prove your side or to disprove the other. Continue reading “Book Review: Charlinder's Walk”

Book Review: Charlinder’s Walk


“We’re not ‘afraid of’ anything except giving you lot the idea that there is anything to talk about involving your God. Just who are you to decide what anyone should be talking about around here, anyway?” demanded Miriam.

“Maybe we do it out of concern for your souls,” Ruth offered, still just as composed as ever above her array of slender knitting needles and two-ply yarn. “Maybe we want you to start talking about what led to the Plague because we don’t want you to suffer eternal damnation in Hell for your actions.”

Charlinder wanted to run home and bury himself under a pile of Eileen Woodlawn’s writings, but one look at Phoebe’s face showed him what he felt: they just couldn’t look away.

Miriam began laughing again. “And who’s going to tell us what kind of behavior is going to send us to Hell? You?” she scoffed. “That is, assuming your promises of Heaven and Hell are places that really exist, which I’m far from convinced they are, but you know how I really feel about what caused the Plague, and what your God may have had to do with it?”

“No, Miriam, tell me how you really feel,” Ruth said flatly.

“I just don’t care one way or the other. I don’t see why anyone gives a lamb’s tail about what caused a disease that snuffed itself out almost a hundred-twenty years ago, when we have much more important things to do than argue over what might have happened. The Plague is in the past; it is history. We need to take care of the present, and if you have enough time on your hands to be quibbling about something that far in the past, then you’re not doing enough to get this farm moving into the future.”

Phoebe looked extremely impressed with Miriam’s rant, but Ruth was unfazed.

“But what kind of future will we have if we just make the same mistakes that brought God’s anger on our ancestors? How many of us will survive another Plague?”

“And again I ask,” Miriam continued, “Who are you to know what any supposed God wants us to do, any more than the rest of us? And have you ever found it a little strange how your whole argument for why we should love God, and worship Him, and build our lives around bending to His will and honoring His divine plan, is that He supposedly brought about a disease that killed over six and a half billion people in less than two years? Have you ever considered how that looks to those of us who aren’t impressed with your reasoning for why God even exists in the first place? Any God who would do that to His creations for disobeying a moral code that He never even bothered to communicate to them is, as far as I care, not a God who deserves even our respect, much less our worship.”

This time, even Ruth was shocked. She finally blinked and recovered her voice enough to say, “There doesn’t have to be any mystery in what God expects from us. It’s a pity that none of our original survivors left a Bible in good enough condition to last this long, but all you have to do is pray, and listen to what He says.”

“Except I don’t think you, or any of the other Faithful, want us to pray,” Miriam told her. “You don’t want us to listen to voices only we can hear, and you don’t want us to discuss what we think may have happened over a hundred years ago. You want us to listen to you. And that’s why the rest of us don’t want to have this conversation. It doesn’t matter why our ancestors saw all their family and friends die of the Plague, because at this point, there’s nothing we can do to change the fact that it happened. Arguing about what they did to bring that disease on themselves isn’t going to make our children’s lives any easier or better. The only people who have any reason to care about why the Plague happened are long since dead.”

It is all too easy to ignore the arguments of someone you disagree with. Their argument falls on deaf ears as your counter-argument will be equally unheard. It is a rare thing to take the steps neccesary to prove your side or to disprove the other. Continue reading “Book Review: Charlinder’s Walk”

Apocalypse Rising 042912


 

LONDON, ENGLAND - OCTOBER 24:  The sun rises b...
LONDON, ENGLAND - OCTOBER 24: The sun rises behind the Canary Wharf skyscrapers on the Isle of Dogs on October 24, 2011 in London, England. The Canary Wharf financial district, which was constructed in the 1980s on the site of the derelict West India Docks, is home to the headquarters of numerous banks and financial institutions. (Image credit: Getty Images via @daylife)

She turns, and looks to the front of the alley while I replace the manhole cover. Her sorrow makes my heart hurt. For all of the time I have spent with mortal man, I had forgotten the elves, and their plight was far worse. Humanity had a chance to save itself, to rise above the tide of darkness that had been growing for so long. They fight with the strength of the dying, aware of their own mortality and the brief time they have to make a difference. The elves have given up. They remember when the Father walked the earth amongst them, and they are sure he has forgotten them. I am not sure that they are wrong

I walk to the front of the alley, and look up and down the road. We are a couple of blocks away from the front of Hitaratsu. I expected to see police cars and ambulance in front of the building, but I see nothing. “Come on, Accantha, let’s go grab some attention,” I say before stepping out of the alley, and walking in that direction. Continue reading “Apocalypse Rising 042912”